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Rose Opéra, Français - English
Le Jardin Retrou...
post 12-Jun-2009, 02:21 PM
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Français :

En 1952, Yuri Gutsatz a été sollicité par Maurice Lehmann, directeur de l'Opéra de Paris, pour parfumer le ballet « les Indes galantes » de Rameau.

Il a imaginé pour le ballet des Fleurs, dans un splendide décor de Wakhevitch, à l'apparition de la Rose, un parfum à l'odeur extrêmement envoûtante, capiteuse, riche avec des accents miellés.

Lisez toute l'histoire de la Rose Opéra ici !

English :

In 1952, Yuri Gutsatz was asked by to perfume the Paris Opera House for « Les Indes Galantes », an opera by Rameau.

He conceived, for the 2nd Act of the "Ballet des Fleurs", in the splendid décor created by Wakhevitch, a Perfume called "Apparition de la Rose".

"L'Apparition de la Rose" was his source of inspiration when he created his Rose Opéra!

What they say about it:

Cologne Perfume.com: The story behind Rose Opéra gives an added pleasure in wearing it. One can imagine the curtain rising and being a part of this historical event.


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Le Jardin Retrouvé
3 cour Jasmin
FR - 75016 Paris
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Le Jardin Retrou...
post 3-Oct-2009, 01:35 PM
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The Rose Opéra story (Summary)

Two events of varying significance marked my career in ROURE: my two encounters with INDIA. In 1952, Rameau's opera-ballet "LES INDES GALANTES" produced at the Opéra de Paris by Maurice LEHMANN, former director of the CHATELET and in 1956/57, INDIA itself, where I lived for almost 6 years.

Les INDES GALANTES ... Maurice Lehmann, Director of the integrated Lyrique-Opéra and the OPERA COMIQUE theatres, wished to introduce PERFUME as part of theatre production, just as sound and light were. He chose an opera-ballet of the 18th century, LES INDES GALANTES, for production in the CHATELET style.

During several months I lived a truly unique experience, getting to know another world: the backstage of the Opéra, the reverse of the decor, the vagaries of the star dancers, the danseurs étoiles, whose names are now forgotten: Michelle Bardin, Michel Renault, and so many others.

It so happened that since 1936 the Opéra had been equipped with a system of air circulation and renewal that changed the entire volume of air in 10 minutes and could therefore evacuate whatever perfume had been diffused and so it was simply enough to release perfume at the air conditioning vent inlets under the dome to perfume the whole 19 000 cubic meters with just two small flacons of 25 ml each in a concentration of 15% to accomplish this operation.

The perfume also had to reach the auditorium at a given moment. Today, a computer could calculate this very easily - in 1952 one had to proceed by trial and error, and during the first performances the perfume reached either too early or too late. But we finally found a musical marker signalling when to trigger our system and coordinate olfactory perception with that of the visual.

What perfume should one choose? Mr. LEHMANN cautioned me saying that on no account should a perfume that could indispose the ladies in the stalls be used. I suggested three perfumes to Mr. LEHMANN: the first of them one of the OPOPONAX AMBER type for the second act featuring the eruption of a volcano (masterfully orchestrated by RUGGIERI), a ROSE for the fourth act – the ballet of the flowers, where the principal dancer, dressed as a ROSE, emerged from a trap door - and finally a JASMINE for a decor representing a primitive island with imaginary flowers and ballet dancers dressed as panthers around the extras dressed as plumed warriors.

The first perfume was soon abandoned, well before the dress rehearsal, since the eruption of the volcano was followed by a smell of gunpowder.

There remained the ROSE and JASMINE.

Without concern for cost I prepared a ROSE perfume for the INDES IMMAGINAIRES (Imaginary India) of the 18th century – in a luxurious WAKHEVITCH décor, combining Persian architecture with French-garden motifs.

For the JASMIN of the wild dances, my approach was similar: a great deal of Absolute Jasmine Ether and Benzyl with the customary accents of YLANG-YLANG, NEROLI and spices.

I attended around 150 performances of the INDES GALLANTES and, each time, I heard the spectators whisper "it smells like roses", but not once did I hear a whisper about the jasmine! Simply because the smell of the rose is familiar and the jasmine is not, and secondly because there was a dancer dressed as a ROSE on stage.

This experience was singular, even though Maurice LEHMANN asked me to perfume

Weber's OBERON later - for which I had imagined a green-algae perfume for a scene with tritons and naiads frolicking in the depths of murky underwater. A bit reminiscent of BALMAIN's VENT VERT. But without success: the spectators glanced at their neighbours thinking it was the perfume of the person next to them.

This is an unusual anecdote about perfumery and one that has left me personally with a wonderful souvenir where I was able to discover a world that I otherwise would never have known.

Yuri Gutsatz


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Le Jardin Retrouvé
3 cour Jasmin
FR - 75016 Paris
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